Tag Archives: Tom Hardy

“Tinker Tailer Soldier Spy” (2012) – 5-Obstructions Review

Click on image to be taken to "Myfilmviews"-the originator of the Blogathon

Click on image to be taken to “Myfilmviews”-the originator of the Blogathon

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Director: Tomas Alfredson

Writers: Bridget O’Connor and Peter Straughan

Stars: Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, Benedict Cumberpatch, John Hurt

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a film based on a John le Carre novel of the same name. Instead of starting my review with my own synopsis I will present the description from Amazon. I do this not out of laziness, but out of the belief that you would need at least a Master’s in English Composition to successfully summarize the plot in one or two paragraphs. That being said, here you go: “The man he knew as ‘Control’ (John Hurt) is dead, and the young Turks who forced him out now run the Circus. But George Smiley (Gary Oldman) isn’t quite ready for retirement-especially when a pretty, would-be defector surfaces with a shocking accusation: a Soviet mole has penetrated the highest level of British Intelligence. Relying only on his wits and a small, loyal cadre, Smiley recognizes the hand of Karla-his Moscow Centre nemesis-and sets a trap to catch the traitor.” The story is set in the 70s during the Cold War and involves the British and Soviet Intelligence Agencies.

The film is impossibly slow and obtuse. A cold-war thriller has never been this dull. The story would lead you to believe the only spycraft that occurred during the 70s was the spies watching themselves within their own agency. These “spymasters” are more worried about their own pecking order within the organization then actually spying on the enemy. And when an enemy is finally revealed, their motivation, “the West has become so ugly,” is so ridiculous it is almost comical. The admittedly impressive cast of British thespians is brought low by the story.

Gary Oldman, normally a dynamic actor, walks like a zombie through the film. His one singular moment to shine, the scene in which he tells of his meeting with the present head of the KGB, allows a brief glimpse of the fine actor we know him to be. Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hardy, and Colin Firth are fine given the material they had to work with. As for John Hurt and Mark Strong, John Hurt plays John Hurt and Mark Strong continues to prove he is the Ted McGinley of film.

The only positives for the film are its music and set direction. The choice of songs and score works for the setting, and the same can be said for the art design. But alas, when the best thing that can be said for a film are its choice in music, then you have a poor film

Grade = D

P.S. My real grade for the film is an “A”. You can read the review here VMR’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

Click on image to view trailer

Click on image to view trailer

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“Dark Knight Rises” (2012) – IMAX – Movie Review

Click on image to view trailer

Director:  Christopher Nolan

Writers:  Jonathan & Christopher Nolan

Stars:  Christian Bale, Tom Hardy, Ann Hathaway, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Gary Oldman, Marion Cotillard, Morgan Freeman, and Michael Cain

The Dark Knight Rises begins in Central Asia eight years after the events of The Dark Knight.  A wanted Russian nuclear scientist, Dr. Pavel (Alon Aboutbol), is being transported by plane along with three captured hooded mercenaries.  While in the air another plane intercepts the first.  In short order, Bane (Tom Hardy) reveals himself as one of the hooded prisoners, his men disable the plane, they kidnap the scientist, and destroy the C.I.A. plane.  Bane is revealed to be feared, cunning, methodical, and his men fanatically loyal.

In Gotham, the lie of Harvey Dent is still being perpetuated.  A law in his name has sent many to jail, and a city holiday exists in his honor.  The Batman is still wanted for Dent’s crimes, and Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) is battered and a recluse.  All the while Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman) is being psychologically eaten from the inside by the poison that is the lie of Harvey Dent.  Gotham is ripe for the fall.

The Nolan Batman Trilogy comes full circle with the story of Rises roughly following Batman Begins.  Instead of Falcone and the Scarecrow there is Daggett (Ben Mendelsohn) and Bane.  And just as Falcone thought he controlled the Scarecrow and then was later betrayed by him, the same occurs between Daggett and Bane.  As in Batman Begins where Bruce Wayne is trained in the lair of his enemy, hereto he receives an education about himself in his enemies prison.  And most important of all, Ra’s Al Ghul’s (Liam Neeson) words are made true:  a man can be destroyed, but a legend can never die.  What’s amazing about the story is how little the Dark Knight is actually in it and how much the legend of him is–especially through the eyes of John Blake (Joseph Gordon-Levitt).  It is John Blake who calls Batman to action, it is John Blake who brings hope, it is John Blake who remains true through all the evil and lies, and it is John Blake who rises along with Bruce Wayne.

The look of the film is real as opposed to dark.  Gotham in the first two films is overwhelmingly oppressive.  Here Gotham is New York, not some hyper-realized version of it.  Even at its darkest moments in the story there is always light symbolizing hope.  The destruction of the stadium and bridges occurs during the day and not the night.  The prison pit of the damned has a great oculus where only day is ever seen.  The final battle between good and evil occurs during the sunlight of a cold winter’s day.

The story is amazingly well paced.  Though clocking in at 164 minutes, the movie never drags and only has minimal fat–specifically the Police Commander Foley (Matthew Modine) storyline.  More importantly, moments of humor are allowed to occur.

The acting is strong across the board, especially the poignant scenes being between Alfred (Michael Cain) and Bruce Wayne.  Cain and Bale have developed a natural chemistry together, and you can feel their affection for each other.  Almost as strong are the interactions between Gordon-Levitt and Oldman.  Their relationship a microcosm of a father and son.  In the beginning, a son places his father on a pedestal; a god to admire, learn from, and emulate.  But by the end, a son sees his father with open eyes; a man with faults who has made mistakes, a man you can still learn from but can also learn from you.

Hathaway succeeds in bringing both a very accurate depiction of the Catwoman from the comics to the big screen, as well as a very realistic portrayal of the character.  An important observation to note is Selina Kyle is only ever Selina Kyle and is never mentioned as Catwoman.  And what of Tom Hardy as Bane?  He brings a raw physicality and menace to the role.  And there is something to be said to have that British voice behind the mask, as well as his eyes.  There is a tragedy in seeing Tom Hardy’s face in a flashback of Bane and knowing that he becomes a monster.

If not for the final ninety seconds a great movie could have been a perfect film.  If only the film would have ended with Blake’s tale and no other.

Grade = A-


“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” – Movie Review

Click on image to view original trailer

Director:  Tomas Alfredson

Writers:  Bridget O’Connor and Peter Straughan

Stars:  Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, Benedict Cumberpatch, John Hurt

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a film based on a John le Carre novel of the same name.  I am going to take the advice of JoTheBW, a vlogger I found while looking for the trailer.  Instead of starting her review with her own synopsis, she just read the book jacket; so I will read the description from Amazon.  I do this not out of laziness, but out of the belief that you would need at least a Master’s in English Composition to successfully summarize the plot in one or two paragraphs.  That being said, here you go:  “The man he knew as “Control” (John Hurt) is dead, and the young Turks who forced him out now run the Circus. But George Smiley (Gary Oldman) isn’t quite ready for retirement-especially when a pretty, would-be defector surfaces with a shocking accusation: a Soviet mole has penetrated the highest level of British Intelligence. Relying only on his wits and a small, loyal cadre, Smiley recognizes the hand of Karla-his Moscow Centre nemesis-and sets a trap to catch the traitor.”  The story is set in the 70s during the Cold War and involves the British and Soviet Intelligence Agencies.

First, I loved this film.  Second, it is not for everyone.  The pacing is deliberately slow, and the story demands all of your attention.  I knew from reading Connie Ogle’s review in The Miami Herald, and Rene Rodriguez’s (the regular film critic for The Herald) Facebook comment about being lost within the first ten minutes of the film that I had to stay focused.  That being said, you should also know the term “Circus” refers to the British Intelligence Agency and not an actual circus like one used in the much underappreciated James Bond movie Octopussy.

The direction by Tomas Alfredson is superb, and the look of the film is appropriately bleak & downtrodden.  The score fits the Cold War setting and adds tension.  Scenes are well shot and blocked.  Little details are allowed to be shown:  the small piece of paper or wood that Smiley puts on the hinge side of his door to see if someone has opened it or not, and Smiley removing his shoes so he can walk across a wood floor in sox and not make any noise are two that come to mind.  The opening credit scene with a disgraced Control and a forced out Smiley leaving the Circus’ office is a masterwork of showing and not telling:  the young Turks glee to see them off; the security of the top-floor brass; the mundane bureaucracy of the lower floors; the sadness of the support personnel as Control & Smiley walk by them, supposedly never to return.  The film comes full-circle at the end when this scene is reversed to the French Song “Le Mer”, and Smiley takes his seat at the head of the Circus.

In a cast that includes almost every great male British character actor, three stand-out.  Gary Oldman has never been more subdued or looked older.  His portrayal of George Smiley shows the character’s weariness and moral ambiguity.  His monologue regarding the time he tried to convince a Soviet agent to defect is made powerful by the quiet way it is delivered and the emotional exhaustion Oldman conveys in giving it.  Oldman’s Smiley is no tired bureaucrat, but a quiet man capable of evil things.  The second actor is the recipient of the monologue, Benedict Cumberbatch as Peter Guillam, Smiley’s loyal confidant.  That loyalty puts the Guillam character into conflict with the same agency he works for, and this causes him conflict that Cumberbatch effectively shows.  And like Smiley he is no simple bureaucrat, but a dangerous company man.  He looks like what I imagine a British agent to look like:  thin, elegant, and slightly menacing.  But he is still a human being with emotions and weaknesses.  The scene in which Guillam has to leave his male lover because he may also be being watched is truly emotional.  The last is Tom Hardy as Ricki Tarr.  Hardy is an actor that always seems to look different in every role, but remains recognizable.  As Ricki he convinces you that this is a man on the edge and wants to get away.  I felt for him at the end of the film as he was waiting for someone that was not coming back.

This is a film to enjoy for the small details and nuances.  Details more easily witnessed on the big screen in a dark theatre.  If you want an old fashioned Cold War thriller that is going to force you to think and pay attention, then this is your film.

Grade = A

P.S.  I liked the film so much I included a second trailer below.

2nd Trailer


“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” – Poster

I’m a big fan of this poster.  I like the numbers making the image of Gary Oldman, and how the red title font reminds me of the Russian alphabet.


“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier Boy” Trailer

“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier Boy” is a based on the John le Carre novel, and is coming out on September 16th.

Click on the image to view trailer

 

I didn’t know this film was in production, but it has a stellar cast:  Colin Firth, Gary Oldman, and Tom Hardy.  It’s going to be great to watch an old time Soviet era thriller; especially where technology takes a back seat to actual human espionage.